Marketer as a Barbie Game Changer

  • Donafeby Widyani Macquarie University
Keywords: Barbie, Body Dissatisfaction, Marketing, Self-esteem

Abstract

This paper addresses issues about how the Barbie doll can provide an unrealistic vision of how women should look and what marketers can do about it. Barbie is a well-known doll that has become a role model for girls. However,  Barbie dolls have attracted much criticism. Studies found that Barbie shapes the body image of young girls and possibly creates body dissatisfaction and low self-esteem among girls. Body dissatisfaction can lead to eating disorders and low self-esteem can lead to depressive behavior. Answering that phenomenon, Barbie launched Barbie Fashionista that has a diverse body type. However, Girls still tend to choose thinner Barbie. Barbie’s marketer should encourage girls to play more with a more realistic body image Barbie such as curvy, tall, and petite, and encourage the children to feel good about their bodies.

Downloads

Download data is not yet available.

References

Anschutz, D. J., & EngeIs, R. C. (2010). The effects of playing with thin dolls on body image and food intake in young girls. Sex roles, 63(9-10), 621-630.
Baron, R. A., & Byrne, D. (1987). Social psychology: Understanding human interaction. Allyn & Bacon.
Dion, J., Hains, J., Vachon, P., PIouffe, J., Iaberge, I., Perron, M., & Leone, M. (2016). Correlates of body dissatisfaction in children. The Journal of pediatrics, 171, 202-207.
Dittmar, H., Halliwell, E., & Ive, S. (2006). Does Barbie make girls want to be thin? The effect of experimental exposure to images of doIIs on the body image of 5-to 8-year-old girls. developmental psychology, 42(2), 283.
Dohnt, H., & Tiggemann, M. (2006). The contribution of peer and media influences to the development of body satisfaction and self-esteem in young girls: A prospective study. developmental psychology, 42(5), 929.
Fashionista.com (2016). Barbie adds tall, curvy and petite body types to its doll line. Retrieved from https://fashionista.com/2016/01/barbie-tall-curvy-petite
Harriger, J. A., Schaefer, I. M., Thompson, J. K., & Cao, I. (2019). You can buy a child a curvy Barbie doll, but you can’t make her Iike it: Young girl’s beliefs about Barbie doIIs with diverse shapes and sizes. Body image, 30, 107-113.
Harter, S. (1993). Causes and consequences of low self-esteem in children and adolescents. In Self-esteem (pp. 87-116). Springer, Boston, MA.
Jellinek, R. D., Myers, T. A., & KeIIer, K. I. (2016). The impact of doll style of dress and familiarity on body dissatisfaction in 6-to 8-year-old girls. Body image, 18, 78-85.
MacDonald, G., & Leary, M. R. (2012). Individual differences in self-esteem. In M. R. Leary & J. P. Tangney (Eds.), Handbook of self and identity (pp. 354–377). New York, NY: Guilford.
Magro, A. M. (1997). Why Barbie is perceived as beautiful. Perceptual and Motor Skills, 85(1), 363-374.
Mattel.com (2020). History. Retrieved from https://corporate.mattel.com/en-us/about/history
Moss, H. (2011). Body dissatisfaction in adolescents with eating disorders: Associations with maladaptive perfectionism and anxiety. Christchurch: University of Canterbury.
Nesbitt, A., Sabiston, C. M., deJonge, M., SoIomon-Krakus, S., & WeIsh, T. N. (2019). Barbie’s new look: ExpIoring cognitive body representation among female children and adolescents. PloS one, 14(6), e0218315.
Ollila, Erin (2016). Top 15 Best Selling Toys in History. Retrieved from https://www.nowblitz.com/blog/15-best-selling-toys-in-history/
Ortega-RoIdán, B., Rodríguez-Ruiz, S., Perakakis, P., Fernández-SantaeIIa, M. C., & ViIa, J. (2014). The emotional and attentional impact of exposure to one’s own body in bulimia nervosa: A physiological view. PIoS ONE, 9(7), e102595. http://doi.org/10.1371/journaI.pone.0102595
Osaďan, R., & Hanna, R. (2015). The effects of the media on the self-esteem of young girls. Acta TechnoIogica Dubnicae, 5(1), 37-44.
Paxton, S. J., Neumark-Sztainer, D., Hannan, P. J., & Eisenberg, M. E. (2006). Body dissatisfaction prospectively predicts depressive mood and low self-esteem in adolescent girls and boys. Journal of clinical child and adolescent psychology, 35(4), 539-549.
Phillips, K. A. (2004). Body dysmorphic disorder: recognizing and treating imagined ugliness. World Psychiatry, 3(1), 12–17.
RintaIa, M., & Mustajoki, P. (1992). Could mannequins menstruate? British Medical Journal, 305, 1575–1576.
Rice, K., Prichard, I., Tiggemann, M., & SIater, A. (2016). Exposure to Barbie: Effects on thin-ideal internalization, body esteem, and body dissatisfaction among young girls. Body Image, 19, 142-149.
RicciardeIIi, I. A., & McCabe, M. P. (2001). Children’s body image concerns and eating disturbance: A review of the literature. Clinical psychology review, 21(3), 325-344.
Šivert, S.S., Sinanović, O. (2008). Body dissatisfaction – Is age a factor?. Facta Universitatis Series: philosophy, sociology, psychology and History, 7(1) , 55 – 61.
SIater, A., & Tiggemann, M. (2016). little girls in a grown-up world: Exposure to sexualized media, internalization of sexualization messages, and body image in 6–9-year-old girIs. Body image, 18, 19-22.
Tatangelo, G., McCabe, M., MeIIor, D., & MeaIey, A. (2016). A systematic review of body dissatisfaction and sociocultural messages related to the body among preschool children. Body image, 18, 86-95.
Tiggemann, M. (2003). Media exposure, body dissatisfaction, and disordered eating: Television and magazines are not the same! Eur. Eat. Disord. Rev. 11: 418–430
TyIka, T. I. (2004). The relation between body dissatisfaction and eating disorder symptomatology: An analysis of moderating variables. Journal of Counseling Psychology, 51(2), 178-191. doi:http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/0022-0167.51.2.178
WanIess, M. D. (2001). Barbie's Body Images, , 1:1, 125-127, DOI: 10.1080/14680770120042909
Worobey, J., & Worobey, H. S. (2014). Body-size stigmatization by preschool girls: In a doll's world, it is good to be “Barbie”. Body Image, 11(2), 171-174.
Published
2021-09-30
How to Cite
Widyani, D. (2021). Marketer as a Barbie Game Changer. International Journal of Science, Technology & Management, 2(5), 1918-1921. https://doi.org/10.46729/ijstm.v2i5.349